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Every June, our nation honors Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers by raising awareness. Did you know that worldwide 55 million people are living with Alzheimer’s or Dementia? The hope is that by observing Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, more people will work to find a cure and help those affected by the disease.

What is Alzheimer’s?

According to the CDC, Alzheimer’s disease is a fatal disease that kills nerve cells and tissue in the brain. The disease involves a part of the brain that controls thoughts, memories, and language. It is considered the most common type of dementia. The condition is progressive. It starts with the patient having simple memory loss, and then it can lead to the loss of their ability to have a conversation and respond to their environment. 

Unfortunately, scientists do not fully understand what causes Alzheimer’s disease yet. Several health factors along with individual-specific variables cause the disease. However, there is developing scientific evidence that healthy behaviors may help reduce the risk for subjective cognitive decline. Some scientists speculate genetics could be the cause of the disease. With a healthy lifestyle, disease progression could be mitigated. However, no scientific proof at this time substantiates this claim. Hopefully, Alzheimer’s Awareness Month can help raise money for additional research. 

Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

Of course, memory problems are the first sign of Alzheimer’s, but you could be having memory problems for various reasons, such as certain medications or other factors. It is important to note that warning signs do not usually occur until after age 60. It is very rare for anyone under age 60 to be afflicted with this disease. However, if you are over 60 and your memory is resulting in any of the following issues, consult with a doctor. 

  • Changes in mood, behavior, and personality 
  • Poor judgment with increased uncharacteristic impulsivity 
  • Alzheimer’s disease or dementia is a growing disease affecting millions of people a year. June is Alzheimer’s awareness month, and the more action on finding a cure or helping those with the disease and their caregivers is inspiredTrouble handling money or remembering to pay your bills 
  • Problems with completing familiar tasks 
  • Repeating questions or repeating yourself more often 
  • Often misplacing items and then being unable to retrace your steps on where you could have left the thing. 

How You Can Help and Observe Alzheimer’s Month

Visit the website alz.org. It will provide you with links and show you how to participate in activities to raise money and awareness for support, care, and research. Also, you can register for “The Longest Day.” On June 21st, it is the summer solstice, meaning it is the longest day of the year. The theme is standing up to the darkness of Alzheimer’s. Supporters also wear the color purple in June to represent combining the calm stability of blue and the passionate energy of red. 

If you have a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, we encourage you to seek out a support group. At Next Day Access, we will also support you and hope that our products can help make your loved ones more comfortable if they are aging in place with Alzheimer’s disease. 

As we age, we develop normal age-related memory loss, and sometimes our memory loss could relate to lack of sleep or stress. However, sometimes your frequent memory loss could be a sign of premature Alzheimer’s.

Studies show if Alzheimer’s disease is caught early, it can be treated with anti-dementia medication, which slows the progression of the disease. Unfortunately, however, many doctors attribute the signs of Alzheimer’s to getting older and not the disease. Here are some of the differences between normal forgetfulness and Alzheimer’s:

Retrieving Memories

You might have issues remembering things from long ago with normal age-related memory loss. Still, you usually remember something you might have forgotten with aids such as context clues. However, for people battling Alzheimer’s, even recent memories cannot be retrieved. For example, when diagnosing a patient with Alzheimer’s, the doctor might give them three words. One of the words is “apple.” However, when the doctor asks the patient to repeat the three words, and they cannot repeat them, it could be a sign of Alzheimer’s.

Here is a portion of a summary from the website verywellhealth.com that shares the differences between forgetfulness caused by normal aging and Alzheimer’s disease. 

Normal Aging

  • Memory improves with context clues. 
  • Vocabulary and relationship understanding remains intact. 
  • Able to remember the order of things and who said what. 
  • Aware a memory problem exists. 
  • Functioning remains good despite forgetfulness. 

Alzeimer’s

  • Recent memory is poor, and cueing clues or contexts does not help. 
  • Unaware memory problems exist. 
  • They are frequently demonstrating poor judgment and decision-making. 
  • Often disoriented to time and place 
  • Difficulty with familiar chores 
  • Repetitiveness becomes obvious 
  • Memory intrusions occur

When a loved one is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, we at Next Day Access understand the heartbreak and frustration associated with the diagnosis. We are here for you. We offer numerous products that help people battling Alzheimer’s remain safe in their homes. Contact us today to schedule a complimentary consultation

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